News from OAC

OAC Spring Membership Meeting Program

OAC Spring Membership Meeting Program

May 16, 2003

The OAC Spring 2003 meeting will be held on Friday, May 16 in the Auditorium at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus. Prior to the start of the meeting there will be coffee and donuts available in the archaeology classroom adjacent to the auditorium.

Ghosts of the Gray Literature: Presentations of CRM Archaeology

Program

10:00 Introductory remarks by President Brian Redmond
      Program introduction by Robert Riordan, Program Chair

10:05 Albert M. Pecora and Jarrod Burks, Ohio Valley Archaeological Consultants, Ltd., Columbus, OH
      Using geophysics on Phase II projects ... why in the world isn't everyone doin' it?

10:25 Andrew R. Sewell, Hardlines Design Company, Columbus, OH
      Excavations at a late nineteenth century brick factory: the Harmony Brickworks at 36AL480, Leetsdale, Pennsylvania

10:45 Craig S. Keener, Professional Archaeological Services Team, Columbus, OH
      The Clarkson Mine, new applications at Adena, and recent findings at 33DL315, a Middle Woodland period upland encampment

11:10 Business Meeting, President Brian Redmond

Lunch, on your own

1:40 Duane Simpson, AMEC, Louisville, KY and Steve Martin, Hardlines Design Co.
      Magnetometer results from sites 33LE396 and 33LE403 and their implications for improved integration of geophysical techniques into Ohio archaeology

2:00 ASC Group, Inc., Columbus, OH (multiple presenters)
      Archaeological investigations associated with five CRM projects (see abstract)

3:00 Adjournment



Abstracts

Albert M. Pecora, Ohio Valley Archaeological Consultants, Ltd., Columbus, OH and Jarrod Burks, National Park Service , Chillicothe, OH
Using geophysics on Phase II projects ... why in the world isn't everyone doin' it?

Over the past year Ohio Valley Archaeological Consultants, Ltd. has conducted geophysical surveys in advance of Phase II site assessment studies. This presentation focuses on magnetic data collected from several Ohio sites. Using the FM36 Fluxgate Gradiometer, we have identified a variety of archaeological features at both historic-era and prehistoric sites. Traditional hand excavation methods were then used to expose and document the features. Our results demonstrate that geophysics is an absolutely essential component of Phase II site assessment research. Not only do magnetic data add an additional layer of information across the site, but they are also useful for project planning and they obviate the need for heavy equipment. Geophysical survey is a much more "resource friendly" method for assessing site significance. The ability to pinpoint subsurface features for testing allows for the preservation of larger portions of the site. So, if geophysical survey is fast, efficient, and less damaging to the resource we are trying to protect, why isn't everybody doing it?



Andrew Sewell, Hardlines Design Company, Columbus, OH
Excavations at a late nineteenth century brick factory: the Harmony Brickworks at 36AL480, Leetsdale, Pennsylvania

Hardlines Design was contracted to investigate a nineteenth century brickworks site as a Phase III data recovery project in November-December 2000 and March -April 2001 by the Pittsburgh District Corps of Engineers. The Harmony Brickworks was an industrial brick factory owned by the Harmony Society and operated in Leetsdale, Pennsylvania between 1890 and 1901. Numerous elements of the brick factory's massive dry floor complex were encountered, as well as parts of the kilns on site and sparse remnants of an earlier brickworks that existed on the site. The project provided an illuminating glimpse into industrial brick production at the end of the nineteenth century.



Craig S. Keener, Professional Archaeological Services Team, Columbus, OH
The Clarkson Mine, new applications at Adena, and recent findings at 33DL315, a Middle Woodland period upland encampment

This presentation highlights three significant archaeological projects conducted by Professional Archaeological Services team (PAST) over the past three years. Three archaeological sites (the Adena Estate, the Clarkson Mine (33BL333), and site 33DL1315) are presented and the findings summarized. At Adena, new interpretations of artifact distributions are presented. The Clarkson Mine represents the first Phase III mitigation of a historic coal mine complex in Ohio and highlights the potential of traditional historical archaeology in an industrial landscape. Site 33DL1315 is an upland ceramic and lithic deposit containing Archaic and Woodland components. The site may represent a possible base camp, and C-14 dates of two features suggest occupation during the Middle Woodland and Late Prehistoric periods. Remote sensing data and distribution maps of the artifact classes recovered at the site and ongoing work are presented.



Duane Simpson, AMEC, Louisville, KY
Steve Martin, Hardlines Design Company, Columbus, OH
Magnetometer results from sites 33Le396 and 33Le403 and their implications for improved integration of geophysical techniques into Ohio archeology

The ODOT Office of Environmental Services has begun a concerted effort to incorporate geophysical investigations into testing and mitigation of archeological sites, placing it at the forefront of a developing field in CRM. Recent excavations at two sites, 33Le396 and 33Le403, along the proposed improvements of S.R. 7 in Lawrence County, Ohio, had magnetometer surveys completed prior to Phase III mitigation. While the surveys proved partially effective, modifications to the Data Recovery Plan could have afforded a greater impact on the mitigation of the site. These surveys can therefore be used as a basis to discuss the incorporation of geophysical surveys into archeological projects.



ASC Group, Inc., Columbus, OH
Archaeological investigations associated with five CRM projects

ASC Group will present summaries of archaeological investigations concerning the following projects or sites: Data recovery at 33DL27, an early Late Woodland habitation in Delaware County excavated prior to road construction for the City of Westerville; data recovery at 33FR560, an early Late Woodland habitation in Franklin County excavated prior to construction at the city of Columbus' Southerly Wastewater Treatment Plant; deep testing in the Scioto River floodplain at the city of Columbus' Southerly Wastewater Treatment Plant; data recovery at three Late Archaic/Early Woodland sites prior to the relocation of State Route 16 in Muskingum County for the Longaberger Company; survey and assessment at sites in Jackson County for a power plant and well field.

 

The Fourth Annual Ohio Archaeology Week

The Fourth Annual Ohio Archaeology Week

June 15-21, 2003

The public is invited to help celebrate the 4th annual Ohio Archaeology Week to run between June 15 - 21, 2003. The mission of Ohio Archaeology Week is to promote awareness of Ohio's cultural heritage as revealed through nearly 200 years of archaeological research! A series of statewide educational events designed to highlight archaeological research throughout Ohio are planned. Events include tours of local museums/parks, visits to on-going archaeological digs, demonstrations of ancient pottery making and flint knapping (or tool manufacture), prehistoric and historic artifact identification sessions, virtual tours of archaeology excavations, Native American story telling, and several public presentations by archaeologists. General events information for this year can be obtained from Linda Whitman, Chair of Ohio Archaeological Council Education Committee, at 330-972-6179 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The 2003 Ohio Archaeology Week is a volunteer effort, jointly sponsored by several museums and educational programs including those of the Ohio Archaeological Council.

National Park Service's 2003 Archaeological Prospection Workshop

National Park Service's 2003 Archaeological Prospection Workshop

Steven DeVore

The National Park Service's 2003 workshop on archaeological prospection techniques entitlted "Current Archaeological Prospection Advances for Non-Destructive Investigations in the 21st Century" will be held May 19 through 23, 2003, at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site, Collinsville, Illinois. The workshop covers geophysical techniques, aerial photography, and other remote sensing methods as they apply to the identification, evaluation, conservation, and preservation of archaeological resources across the Nation. There is a $475.00 tuition charge. For further information and registration forms, contact Steven L. DeVore at the Midwest Archeological Center, National Park Service, Lincoln, Nebraska: tel. (402) 437-5392, ext. 141; email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

President's Message - March 2002

President's Message - March 2002

Brian G. Redmond

As I begin my two-year term as President of the OAC, I am happy to report that the future of our organization looks bright. Our membership has nearly reached the 120 mark and continues to increase. The Council website is now on-line, thanks to the work of Christopher Pierce, and already contains a wealth of news, articles, and other information related to archaeology in our state.

The Board of Directors has been quite busy since the fall membership meeting. We held a face-to-face meeting in February, but much of our business is now being conducted via e-mail dialogues. One benefit of this new medium has been the streamlining of our approval system for selecting new members. Craig Keener and his Membership Committee have promptly processed and secured Trustee approval of several new membership applications just since January. I think that the shorter turn-around time that this new procedure provides may be, in part, responsible for the accelerated growth of our membership.

Image

Of course, people don't join an organization like ours solely on the basis of an efficient membership system or even the availability of a good website. The fine turnout of members and interested guests at our November membership meeting at Highbanks Metropark confirmed my long-held belief that the OAC works best when our people get together to 'talk archaeology.' This includes listening to formal presentations, holding informal chats out in the hall, and even taking a long walk on a beautiful fall day to see an archaeological site (thanks Martha!). President-elect, Bob Riordan is busy planning our spring meeting which is set for Saturday, May 18 at the Ohio Historical Society.

Finally, allow me to return to the birth of our website which has made it possible for the OAC to reach a much larger audience. We anticipate that this exposure will increase the sales of our current publications, attract new members, and provide current information on Ohio archaeology beyond our membership to other professionals and the interested public. As you examine the website content, you will notice that much of it is derived from past issues of the OAC Newsletter. I see this as the initial stage in a natural evolution of our organization's communication function. This is, in other words, a tranformation of a static and rather limited medium, the paper newsletter, into a dynamic and virtually unlimited format which is the OAC website. With this new capability now in-hand, I and the Board no longer see the need or can justify the cost of publishing the current hard copy version of the Newsletter. Consequently, I have decided that the October issue (Volume 14, No. 2) will be the last in the series. Beginning in 2003, the typical contents of our Newsletter will be published only on the OAC website. I will discuss these changes in greater detail in the October issue of the Newsletter (and on the website!) so please stay tuned. In the meantime, I encourage your thoughts and constructive comments concerning all aspects of the Council's activities, publications, and programs. As I said at the outset, our future looks very bright!

Ad Hoc Legislative Issues Committee Report - March 2002

Ad Hoc Legislative Issues Committee Report - March 2002

Al Tonetti, Committee Chair

State Legislation (Information about state laws, legislation, legislators, etc., can be found at www.legislature.state.oh.us.

House Select Committee Studying the Effectiveness of Ohio's Historical Programs and Partnerships

Recently, the OAC made significant progress in getting the State Legislature to understand and address our concerns with the identification, evaluation, protection, and interpretation of important archaeological resources in Ohio. This progress is reflected in the Select Committee's preliminary and final reports, both of which are available here on the OAC website.

The focus of the Committee's work over the last five months was on attending hearings and preparing and presenting testimony as an interested party to the House Select Committee Studying the Effectiveness of Ohio's Historical Programs and Partnerships. Since November 7, 2001, the Select Committee met 13 times. The Legislative Issues Committee had representation at nine of these meetings. The Select Committee released its preliminary report on February 20, 2002, and submitted its final report to Speaker Householder on March 7, 2002.

On January 23, 2002, the OAC presented written and oral testimony concerning the Ohio Historical Society's archaeological programs and partnerships. On February 1, 2002, the OAC submitted written testimony providing cost estimates and potential sources of funding for implementing the recommendations contained in our January 23 testimony. On February 27, 2002, the OAC presented written and oral testimony concerning the Select Committee's preliminary report. The full text of the three testimonies is presented on the OAC website. All testimony was prepared and submitted on behalf of the OAC membership and President Brian Redmond by Legislative Issues Committee Chair Al Tonetti. All testimony was prepared with the input of the Legislative Issues Committee and the Board of Directors.

A number of the recommendations made by the OAC were accepted by the Select Committee and appear in their preliminary report. At the time this article was written, the Select Committee's final report had not been released. These recommendations include, but are not limited to:

  • The Ohio Historic Preservation Office developing and implementing a state archaeological preservation plan to streamline the identification and evaluation of important archaeological sites;
  • The State of Ohio developing and implementing an abandoned cemetery and unmarked human burial ground preservation program (Ohio is one of only a few states that does not have a program protecting such places);
  • The repeal of the State registries of Historic Landmarks and Archaeological Landmarks because the programs are fatally flawed (only one property has been listed in 26 years);
  • The Ohio Historical Society developing management plans for State Memorials;
  • The Ohio Historical Society obtaining comments from interested stakeholders concerning its archaeological programs, and reporting to the State Legislature concerning the same.

Regarding the last recommendation, the Select Committee has directed the Ohio Historical Society to develop mechanisms to increase communication and input from Native American organizations and the archaeological community and to submit a written report to the Select Committee and the Governor on efforts to do so by September 30, 2002. The OAC will work to see that it is a partner in developing these mechanisms. The Select Committee also recommended that the duties of the Ohio Historic Preservation Office be transferred from the Ohio Historical Society to the Ohio Department of Development. The OAC cautiously supported this recommendation, provided that it increased financial and technological support to OHPO and integrated historic preservation concerns into all levels of State Government.

You can obtain a copy of the Select Committee's preliminary and final reports by contacting the Select Committee Chair, Representative Kerry Metzger, at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by calling his office at (614) 466-1695. In the next few weeks, Representative Metzger intends to introduce legislation implementing the Select Committee's recommendations. However, the introduction of that legislation depends on what Speaker Householder does with the Select Committee's final report. The OAC will prepare and submit written and oral testimony on the bill if and when hearings on it are scheduled. For further information about the House Select Committee and the OAC's testimony contact Al Tonetti.

Teaching Intelligent Design (Creationism) in Public School Science Classes

Recently introduced House Bill 481 requires that "whenever explanations regarding the origins of life are presented, appropriate explanation and disclosure shall be provided regarding the historical nature of origins science and the use of any material assumption which may have provided a basis for the explanation being presented." The goal of the sponsors of this bill is to teach alternative theories concerning the origins of life, i.e., intelligent design/creationism, in public school science classes. The State Board of Education is currently debating whether to add intelligent design/creationism to science curriculum standards that will serve as the basis for a new graduation test and other student assessments. The standards are to be completed by December 31, 2002. Passage of this bill would require that the standards include teaching intelligent design/creationism. If enacted, Ohio would become the first and only state to require teaching alternatives to evolution, i.e., intelligent design/creationism, in public school science classes. The first hearing on this bill before the House Education Committee occurred March 5.

Recently introduced House Bill 484 and Senate Bill 222 require that before state science curriculum standards are adopted and implemented by the State Board of Education, on or before December 31, 2002, the standards must be approved by a concurrent resolution passed by both houses of the General Assembly. This bill provides unprecedented legislative control over the content of the science standards for public schools. It is sponsored by many of the same representatives sponsoring House Bill 481. The first hearing on this bill before the House Education Committee occurred March 5.

Please educate yourself about these bills and contact your legislators with your concerns. The chair of the House Education Committee is Rep. Jamie Callendar (R-Willowick). Contact Rep. Callendar at 77 South High St., 11th Floor, Columbus, OH 43215-6111, telephone (614) 466-7251, fax (614) 644-9494, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. The other Education Committee members are Republicans Calvert, DeWine, Fessler, Hoops, Kearns, Reidelbach (chief sponsor of the bills), Reinhard, Roman, Setzer, Stapleton, Webster, and Williams, and Democrats Hartnett (ranking minority member), Barrett, Carano, Distel, Fedor, Flannery, Seaver, and Woodard.

Federal Legislation

President Bush's proposed 2003 budget (October 1, 2002-September 30, 2003) calls for a 12% reduction ($5 million) in spending for the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Fund, dollars that support the operation of state historic preservation offices, certified local governments, and Indian tribes. A 27% cut ($18 million) is proposed for the National Park Service's Recreation and Preservation budget, funds that support the National Register of Historic Places and related historic preservation programs. Proposed cuts to other federal agencies include $112 million for the Department of Agriculture's Forest Service, a 7% reduction for the Army Corps of Engineers, including making no funds available for the planning and design of new projects, and a whopping 28% reduction ($9.2 billion) for highway spending for the Department of Transportation.

 

Native American Concerns Committee - March 2002

Native American Concerns Committee - March 2002

Al Tonetti, Committee Chair

Fernald Reburial Facility

The OAC is a consulting party in the U.S. Department of Energy's proposal to use part of the land at its Fernald facility, Hamilton County, for the reburial of repatriated Native American human remains and associated funerary items. Consulting party status enables the OAC to receive and review pertinent information, offer ideas, share our views, and consider possible solutions to related issues with the U.S. Department of Energy and other consulting parties. Recently, the Committee received general information about the proposed reburial facility from the U.S. Department of Energy. The Committee is reviewing the information and will prepare a recommendation to the Board of Directors concerning the matter.

Buffalo Site Human Remains

The Committee has been discussing and monitoring recent activities in West Virginia concerning the proposed reburial of the Buffalo site human remains currently in possession of The Ohio State University. The Ohio State University has completed its responsibilities pursuant to the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act. The Buffalo site is a major Fort Ancient village in the town of Buffalo along the Kanawha River in Putnam County, northwest of Charleston. A local group wants the human remains returned to the Buffalo site and reburied on the property owned by American Electric Power.

 

Latest News

by Kevin Schwarz on May 10, 2021
by Eric Olson on April 30, 2021
by Al Tonetti on February 11, 2021