For the last time as president-elect, I am announcing our fall 2021 members meeting. It will be remote and live on October 15th from 9:30 to 12:00. Our meeting will be held via Webex, hosted by president Kevin Nolan. Members will receive an email invitation to Webex meetings in advance of October 15. This one is a bit shorter than our usual meetings, but I am still excited to hear from our presenters, and to discuss OAC business with the members.

For the public, we will be live streaming the meeting, except the OAC business meeting, on the OAC YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCihQNObsGAzCtTT__euQ1kA .See below for a full list of presenters and abstracts. We look forward to seeing you there!

I hope to see you there!

Eric

Time Slot Presenter(s) Topic
9:30 – 10:00   Meghan Marley, Jeff Gill, and Brad Lepper The Newark Holy Stones and the “Coin of Evia”: Lies, Damned Lies, and Barry Fell’s epigraphy
10:00 – 10:30 Brian Redmond Preliminary Descriptions of an Early Late Woodland Post Structure from the Heckleman Site, Erie Co., Ohio
10:30 – 11:00 Kevin Nolan, Christine Thompson, Rebecca Barzilai, and Moayad Yacoub Unearthing a Half-Century of Archaeological Research in Indiana: Digitizing the Report of Investigations and Archaeological Report Series, and Associated Diagnostic Artifacts
11:00 – 12:00   OAC Business Meeting
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Presenter Abstracts

The Newark Holy Stones and the “Coin of Evia”: Lies, Damned Lies, and Barry Fell’s epigraphy

By Meghan Marley, Jeff Gill, and Brad Lepper

The Newark Holy Stones are a series of five fraudulent artifacts inscribed with Hebrew lettering that were found in Licking County, Ohio beginning in 1860. In 1980, Barry Fell, in Saga America, introduced a sixth artifact into the discussion, but instead of a Hebrew inscription, this “Coin of Evia” was said to have Celtiberic lettering. All of the original Holy Stones have been revealed to be forgeries or hoaxes. The misnamed Coin of Evia has been ignored by scholars -- until now. We here outline the circumstances of the discovery of all of these peculiar objects, present the overwhelming evidence for their fraudulent nature, and discuss the disparate agendas behind their creation in the 19th century and their revival in the 20th.


Preliminary Descriptions of an Early Late Woodland Post Structure from the Heckleman Site, Erie Co., Ohio

By Brian Redmond

Recent investigations at the Heckelman site in Erie Co., Ohio have uncovered the partial remains of an early Late Woodland wooden post circle. This construction measures approximately 13 meters in diameter and dates to ca. AD 600-750.  This is the second post circle found at the site; the first measured 21 meters in diameter and is thought to date to the Middle Woodland period. The smaller circle (Structure 5) surrounds a number of Late Woodland pits, charcoal deposits, a large storage pit, and possible interior support posts, the last of which suggests that this was a roofed structure.  This presentation will describe the material remains and preliminary analyses of field data from this recent discovery.

Unearthing a Half-Century of Archaeological Research in Indiana: Digitizing the Report of Investigations and Archaeological Report Series, and Associated Diagnostic Artifacts

By Kevin Nolan, Christine Thompson, Rebecca Barzilai, and Moayad Yacoub 

With funding from the Council on Library and Information Resources, Ball State University’s Applied Anthropology Laboratories is executing multi-year project digitizing over 50 years of archaeological research, making significant Indiana archaeological data readily accessible for the first time. We will share our status, challenges, successes as we enter the second year of this project.  These legacy collections include 18 Archaeological Reports and 110 Reports of Investigations (AR/ROIs) from 1965 to present. AR/ROI reports and maps are currently being scanned, digitized, and redacted; and 4,000 of the most diagnostic and culturally identifiable artifacts associated with these AR/ROIs are being 3D-scanned and photographed. All reports, maps, and artifact images will be uploaded into The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) with artifact models shared on Sketchfab. These AR/ROIs cover Indiana’s long occupation history from the earliest (~11,500 B.C.) precontact American Indian land-use and ceremonial behaviors through frontier military engagements, historic American Indian village/settlements, and twentieth century farmsteads. These difficult to access and underutilized collections contain valuable information for the public, American Indian scholars, historians, and ethno-historians throughout the Midwest and nation.

Latest News

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